The Sheikh and the Dustbin, and Other McAuslan Stories By George MacDonald Fraser


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    Notes of Flashman, but less 'funny' and more fun. Good-natured and sympathetic humour, with a subtle lesson dropped in here and there. Good value. Paperback The last McAuslan collection. Ending with an afterword in which Fraser recounts how he met up with his old Colonel at a book signing and when they had a drink after, the Colonel said that the notice that the regiment never existed, and all the characters were fictitious -- well, that was rot. Possibly libelous rot. Was he a fiction?

    And so we have some more adventures. Like the narrator's problems with servants -- greatly complicated by the way an officer had to have a batman. The time they were subduing civil unrest in Africa, and McAuslan astounded the narrator: on being told that the wogs couldn't govern themselves, with the relative condition of the European and native architecture being pointed out in evidence, McAuslan actually produced the Pyramids as counter-evidence. The bet that involved his men being sent out to make their way by map to a bridge -- and put out a lamp on it as an additional challenge. Paperback An enjoyable conclusion to the stories of GMF's army days. The afterword or Extraduction and dedication are touching. To be taken with a good single malt (or a touch of the 'creature') and repeated as often as necessary. Paperback

    These stories continue the career of Private McAuslan, described by his platoon commander as the biggest walking disaster to hit the British Army since Ancient Pistol, as he goes across North Africa and Scotland. George MacDonald Fraser is the author of the Flashman novels. The Sheikh and the Dustbin, and Other McAuslan Stories

    Free read The Sheikh and the Dustbin, and Other McAuslan Stories

    While his Flashman books are fun, the MacDonald Fraser's McAuslan stories are pure gold. The most natural and gifted story teller I can think of. Paperback I was introduced to George MacDonald Fraser by the Flashman books and because GMF was close to CS Forester on library shelves.

    This book is the last of 3 in the series. I think this last book was written well after the other 2 and was only written due to the popularity of the others. The series is a fictional biographical sketch of Dand MacNeill of a Highland Regiment just after WW2. Finally at the end of this book, it acknowledges that the regiment is the Gordons and the colonel in the stories is Lt. Col Reggie Lees.

    The books consists of short stories (not strictly chronological) of every day military life, whether on home territory or overseas. The books are comedic, light hearted but also as serious as military tradition and soldering can be.

    I own all the books and I've read this series many times. They are fun to read yet you also get a sense of the great British and Highland military tradition. As the last book, it meandered quite a bit more than the first two and it not as tightly written, but as a fan of the series I'll take anything I can get. RIP to all the great characters in the book and the author. Paperback One of several volumes of stories written by GMF based on his own experiences in the army just after WWII. Ranging from the absurd to the touching. You can feel the nostalgia on every page. Rated PG. 3/5
    Paperback Notes of Flashman, but less 'funny' and more fun. Good-natured and sympathetic humour, with a subtle lesson dropped in here and there. Good value. Paperback I love Fraser! We had a McAuslan in my unit in the 82nd Airborne Division. We were a spit and polish outfit, but our McAuslan never achieved higher than rumpled. Every unit in every army in the history of the world had characters like those described by Fraser. But no one writes of them better. Paperback