The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class-and What We Can Do About It (English Edition) eBook : Florida, Richard By Richard Florida

    The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class-and What We Can Do About It (English Edition) eBook : Florida, Richard: : Kindle Store The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class-and What We Can Do About It (English Edition) eBook : Florida, Richard

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    Good product Kindle-editie, Hardcover, Paperback, Cd Tal vez demasiada estadística para mi, me hubiera gustado algo que propusiera mas soluciones, pero creo que ese no es su fin, su fin es informar donde se encuentra la crisis del urbanismo, eso si cumple. Kindle-editie, Hardcover, Paperback, Cd Great synthesis of today’s major urban challenges for successful cities. A must for urban policy makers, econòmic developers, and entrepreneurs. Although focused on the us situation, it is transferable to eu urban situation. Kindle-editie, Hardcover, Paperback, Cd A resident of the BC Lower Mainland, it’s easy to forget that the housing crisis here is an extreme version of issues faced by all metro areas. Unlike Toronto, which is a genuine superstar city, Vancouver combines world class housing costs with below average Canadian household incomes.Many of the issues identified were addressed in his previous books. It is sobering how our cities are increasingly segregated based on income, wealth, and ethnicity. The unaffordability of much of southwest B.C. to the middle class is a painful reality in Vancouver. Yes, I agree that the issues portion of the book could have been shorter. Too many tables and graphs.The most interesting aspect of his book was his last chapter, which could have been expanded upon. Mixed use, walkable moderate density communities that are well serviced with public transit appears to be the way to go. Unaffordable condo canyons are what the Lower Mainland is getting as its light rail public transit system grows outwards.The issues faced by each city are different. Cookie cutter solutions don’t work. Kindle-editie, Hardcover, Paperback, Cd Some 80% of Americans live in cities, most of which are increasingly divided by class and ethnicity. Where I live, in Silicon Valley, corporate government development projects are exacerbating century long spatial inequities that have created a grown underclass. Florida maps the economic and political history of this crisis, from redlining in the 1920s, to deed covenants that excluded people of color through the 1960s, to gentrification from the 1980s onwards, providing extensive data to illustrate both the roots of crisis and its impacts. Among the most important and provocative findings in the book is the counterintuitive reality of liberal cities, where affluent voters would *seem* to inclined to support progressive urban growth policies that reduce poverty, housing costs, and homelessness, having greater inequity of income, education, environmental quality, etc. Importantly, the book concludes with recommendations for urbanism for all that should be starting points for conversation and action by citizens, community organizers, and government leaders. Because the book is highly readable, with fairly limited technical jargon, one would hope it increases awareness and action among ordinary urbanites beyond narrow circles of policy makers. Kindle-editie, Hardcover, Paperback, Cd